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[Photos] Tet Trung Thu Celebrations in Old Hanoi

As this year’s Mid-Autumn Festival approaches, more than a few Saigoneers have shown a renewed interest in the holiday’s traditions.

While mass-produced moon cakes – think bright yellow Kinh Do kiosks temporarily set up on street corners around the city – are on the decline, several trendy local cafes have breathed new life into Tet Trung Thu this year with everything from custom versions of the holiday confection to lantern- and mask-making workshops. Meanwhile, on Saigon’s own phố lồng đèn, a resurgence in traditional glass paper lanterns has kept artisans busy through the holiday season.

With this renewed enthusiasm in mind, take a look back at how Hanoi celebrated Mid-Autumn Festival in the 1920s and ‘30s, courtesy of Flickr master manhhai.

A shop sells children's toys in Hanoi, 1925-1935.

A woman sells cakes and children's toys in Hanoi, 1925-1935.

A lantern shop displays its wares for Mid-Autumn Festival in Hanoi, 1925-1935.

Left: A boy stands with his Mid-Autumn Festival toys. Right: The altar of a wealthy family during Mid-Autumn Festival. Hanoi, 1925-1935.

A Mid-Autumn Festival dragon dance in Hanoi, 1925-1935.

A Mid-Autumn Festival dragon dance in Hanoi, 1925-1935.

A Mid-Autumn Festival dragon dance in Hanoi, 1925-1935.

A Mid-Autumn Festival parade in Hanoi, 1925-1935.

A family altar decorated for Mid-Autumn Festival in Hanoi, 1925-1935.

A Mid-Autumn Festival parade in Hanoi, 1925-1935.

A boy sits in front of a shop selling Mid-Autumn Festival toys in Hanoi, 1925-1935.

A Mid-Autumn Festival dragon dance outside a toy shop in Hanoi, 1925-1935.

[Photos via Flickr user manhhai]


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[Photos] Saigon’s Glass Paper Lantern Makers Are Back in Business

Bánh Trung Thu, From Traditional Festive Fare to Asia’s Answer to Fruitcake: A Street Food History

[Photos] Vietnam's Mooncake Masters


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