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[Photos] A Midnight Romp Through Saigon’s Wholesale Seafood Market

Around midnight, as most Saigoneers are heading off to bed, District 8’s Binh Dien is the place to be if you’re in search of seafood.

Within the 20,000m2 market, vendors gather nightly to hawk hundreds of varieties of shrimp, fish and other sea creatures, reports VnExpress. Sales carry on through the night until 6am when the market shuts down and vendors head home. The hours in between, however, are bustling with activity.

Take a look below:

[Photos via VnExpress]

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