Saigoneer

Back Stories » Saigon » Regular Downpours May Shut Down Tan Son Nhat Due to Flooding Threat: Official

Regular Downpours May Shut Down Tan Son Nhat Due to Flooding Threat: Official

Less than one month after an epic downpour turned Saigon into a swimming pool and paralyzed Tan Son Nhat International Airport (TSN), a shower which occurred last Sunday forced the facility's management board to consider closing the aerodrome every time it rains cats and dogs in the future.

According Lai Xuan Thanh, director of the Civil Aviation Administration of Vietnam, severe flooding that cripples airport operations could be commonplace in the future.

“As [TSN] is still using the same drainage system as the city, when the surrounding area floods, water around the airport can’t go away either,” he told Thanh Nien. “The worst case is that we have to stop airport activities when there’s heavy flooding to maintain flight safety.”

TSN has been trying to fix the flooding problem ever since a downpour in 2015 disabled its runways, but without a large-scale set of solutions that addresses the root cause, it looks like Tan Son Nhat International “Seaport” is here to stay.

During an interview with the news source, the director of the Southern Airport Authority, Tran Doan Mau, explained how the airport is dealing with common flooding.

“Currently, the immediate solution when flooding happens after heavy rain is pumping excess water out into nearby canals,” Mau explained. “We have two high-power pumps located at the old control tower, each can drain about 1,000 cubic meters per hour.”

Another contributing factor to TSN’s drainage problem is the clogged system of canals around the aerodrome. According to Zing, the A41 canal along Phan Thuc Duyen Street has been gradually eaten up by new houses in the neighborhood. Airport authorities have asked the municipal government to clean up the canal and restore its flow and width so that water can be drained faster after downpours. However, this proposal still hasn’t been greenlit.

The sudden heavy rain which fell on August 26 caused major delays to airport operations, affecting 70 flights, four of which had to divert to airports in Cambodia and even Thailand. Last year, on October 9, another bout of torrential rain also inundated TSN with 20 centimeters of floodwaters and forced authorities to close the airport due to the threat of water getting into its electric substation.

[Photo via Bao Moi]


Related Articles:

[Photos] Downpour Turns Saigon Into Swimming Pool

[Photos] Saigon Turns Into Swimming Pool After Torrential Downpour

Officials Consider Another Tan Son Nhat Expansion as Overcrowding Becomes Dire


Related Articles

in Saigon

$100,000 Diamond Allegedly Vanishes From Woman’s Finger In HCMC Hotel

A Hanoi woman claims that she was drugged at a HCMC hotel last weekend and awoke to find that a $100,000 diamond had been pried from her ring.

in Saigon

100,000 Workers at Saigon Industrial Zones to Get Free WiFi by 2019

Workers at Saigon’s industrial zones can look forward to free WiFi access in the near future thanks to a new program.

in Saigon

100-Year-Old Trees In Front Of Opera House Cut Down To Make Way For Metro

Flower Street and the statues in front of Bến Thành Market aren’t the only sacrifices being made to accommodate the construction of Saigon’s first metro line.

in Saigon

122-Year-Old Saigon Woman Confirmed As World’s Oldest

The World Records Association (WRA) has completed the verification process and officially confirmed Saigon’s 122-year-old Nguyen Thi Tru, as the world’s oldest woman.

in Saigon

160 Wood Benches Being Added To Nguyen Hue Street

The trees that were cut down last July during construction of the metro station in front of the Saigon Opera House are making a comeback in the form of benches.

in Saigon

2 Men Arrested In HCMC For Trying To Ship Gun and Grenade In Guitar Case

Two local men were arrested last Tuesday after attempting to ship a rifle, grenade and 5 bullets to Hanoi in a guitar case. Surprisingly, neither of the men were Antonio Banderas.